My Blog

Posts for: July, 2018

By Dr. Mark Scheiderich
July 30, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
DontTakeaVacationFromOralHygieneThisSummer

What are you most looking forward to this summer? Maybe you’re planning a trip to the beach, or a getaway in the woods…maybe even a journey to a faraway city or a foreign land. Wherever your holiday travel leads you, we hope it’s enjoyable and safe. And while you’re packing your bags, don’t forget to take a trio of important items that can help keep your vacation trouble-free: namely, a soft-bristled toothbrush, a tube of fluoride toothpaste, and a roll of dental floss.

If you have been careful about keeping up your oral hygiene all year, you’ve probably already noticed the rewards it can bring—like a sparkling smile, fresh breath, and good dental checkups. But even if you’re planning to get away from it all this summer, don’t take a vacation from oral hygiene. And if your oral hygiene routine could stand some improvement, maybe this is the time to make a fresh start.

Maintaining good oral health while you’re on the go doesn’t have to be a high-tech pursuit. You don’t need broadband service or a good mobile signal; you don’t even need electric power. Running water is nice, but not essential. And all the tools you need can fit easily in a travel bag.

The benefits of good oral hygiene are clear. Brushing twice every day and flossing once a day can effectively fight the bacteria that cause tooth decay and periodontal disease. That’s important any time of year, but perhaps even more so when you’re traveling because it’s harder to keep a healthy diet. Grabbing a sugary drink or a snack to go is convenient, but it provides food for the bacteria that can cause dental diseases; also, the acid in some soft drinks (even diet sodas) can wear away tooth enamel, leaving you with less protection against cavities.

Summer vacations can bring welcome surprises and unforgettable experiences. But needing urgent dental care in an unfamiliar place is the kind of surprise you can do without. So even though you may be far away from the routines of home, don’t take a vacation from your oral hygiene routine.  It takes just a few minutes, but it can keep your smile bright and healthy wherever you go.

If you would like more information about oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment.


By Dr. Mark Scheiderich
July 20, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   braces  
DwightHowardABrightNBAStarWithaSmiletoMatch

Have you started orthodontic treatment recently? Are you having a little trouble getting used to your braces? If so, you are not alone: Everybody goes through an adjustment period during which they momentarily wonder if they’ll really ever get used to this. Don’t worry — you will! And we’ve never heard anyone say, on the day their braces come off and their new smile is revealed, that they aren’t glad they went the distance. Just ask Houston Rockets all-star center Dwight Howard, who discussed his own orthodontic treatment in a recent interview.

“I’m sure I was no different than anyone else who has ever had braces,” he told Mediaplanet. “At first I hated them so much… That changed once I got used to them and I actually grew to love them.” What’s Howard’s advice? “Do exactly what your orthodontist says and know that the outcome is well worth it in the end.” We couldn’t agree more! Here are some tips for wearing braces comfortably:

  • Hard & Chewy Foods: If you love fresh fruits and vegetables, that’s great; there’s no reason to give them up, just the really hard ones. You don’t want to bite into an apple or carrot or any other hard foods like bagels and pizza that have any “size” to them. Small pieces may be ok as long as they can’t bend your wires. Chewy, sticky candy should really be avoided completely. Same with soda, sports drinks and so-called energy drinks because they contain acids that promote tooth decay and can cause a lot of damage around the braces.
  • Effective Oral Hygiene: Keeping your teeth clean is more important than ever, but also more challenging than ever. It’s easy for food to get stuck under wires and around brackets, but failing to remove it can cause tooth decay, gum irritation and soreness. Therefore, the cleaner your teeth and your braces are, the healthier you will be. Use interdental cleaning brushes and/or a floss-threader to get behind your wires. A mouthrinse can also help strengthen teeth and keep bacteria in check. If you have any questions about how to clean between your teeth, please ask for a demonstration at your next visit.
  • Pain Relief: Some soreness at the beginning of orthodontic treatment is normal. To relieve it, you can use an over-the-counter pain reliever and/or a warm washcloth or heating pad placed on the outside of the jaw. If brackets or wires are rubbing against the inside of your cheeks or lips, try applying wax to these areas of your braces. If this does not offer enough relief, we may be able to trim the end of a poking wire. Call us if you need help with this.

Our goal is to make your orthodontic treatment as comfortable as possible on the way to achieving your all-star smile. If you have questions about adjusting to braces, contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Caring for Teeth During Orthodontic Treatment.”


By Dr. Mark Scheiderich
July 10, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
FAQInterceptiveOrthodonticsforChildren

Have you heard about interceptive orthodontics? This type of early intervention could benefit perhaps 10â??20% of children who need orthodontic treatment, making a positive impact on tooth and jaw development, facial symmetry, and overall self esteem. In case you’re not familiar with it, here are the answers to some common questions about interceptive orthodontic treatment.

Q: What’s the difference between interceptive orthodontics and regular orthodontics?
A: Standard orthodontic treatment typically involves moving teeth into better positions (usually with braces or aligners), and can be done at any age. Interceptive orthodontics uses a variety of techniques to influence the growth and development of teeth and jaws, with the aim of improving their function and appearance. Because it works with the body’s natural growth processes, interceptive treatment is most effective before the onset of puberty (around age 10-14), when growth begins to stop. It is generally not appropriate for adults.

Q: What are the advantages of early treatment with interceptive orthodontics?
A: When it’s done at the right time, interceptive treatment offers results that would be difficult or impossible to achieve at an older age without using more complex or invasive methods — for example, tooth extraction or jaw surgery. That’s why the American Association of Orthodontists, among other professional organizations, recommends that all kids have their first orthodontic screening at age 7.

Q: What are some common issues that can be treated with interceptive orthodontics?
A: One is crowding, where there is not enough room in the jaw to accommodate all the permanent teeth with proper spacing in between. A palatal expander can be used to create more room in the jaw and avoid the need for tooth extraction. Another is a situation where the top and bottom jaws don’t develop at the same rate, resulting in a serious malocclusion (bad bite). A number of special appliances may be used to promote or restrict jaw growth, which can help resolve these problems.

Q: How long does interceptive orthodontic treatment take?
A: Depending on what’s needed, a child might wear a device like a palatal expander or another type of appliance for 6-12 months, followed by a retainer for a period of time. Or, a space maintainer may be left in place for a period of months to hold a place for a permanent tooth to erupt (emerge from the gums). Interceptive treatment ends when a child’s jaw stops growing.

Q: Will braces still be needed after interceptive treatment?
A: Often, but not always, the answer is yes. However, interceptive treatment may shorten the period of time where braces need to be worn, and can help prevent many problems later on.

If you have additional questions about interceptive orthodontics, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Early Orthodontic Evaluation.”